Child Support in New Jersey – Frequently Asked Questions

Child Support in New Jersey – Frequently Asked Questions

Do you have questions regarding child support in New Jersey? Read on for more information about some of the most commonly asked questions.

How Does the Court Determine the Amount of Child Support Payments?

When a court determines child support, there are a lot of different factors that are taken into account. Some of these factors include:

  • The child custody arrangement you and your spouse currently have in place
  • Your child’s needs
  • You and your spouse’s earning capacity
  • You and your spouse’s age and health
  • The age and health of your child
  • Whether your child has any special needs
  • Whether your child is seeking higher education, such as college
  • Whether you or your spouse have any liabilities
  • You and your spouse’s standard of living
  • You and your spouse’s yearly income

When Does the Responsibility to Provide Child Support End? 

Child support payments may end when the child reaches the age of emancipation. In New Jersey, the age of emancipation is 19. That being said, the payments may need to continue past this age. For example, child support may be extended if the child intends to pursue higher education.

Can the Amount For Child Support Payments be Altered Over Time? 

Yes, child support can increase or decrease. But, in order to modify your agreement, you will have to prove that a significant and permanent change has occurred. Some reasons to modify payments may include:

  • An increase or decrease in income
  • A change in federal income tax law
  • Loss of job, or, on the flip side, a promotion
  • A spouse remarries
  • A spouse loses their home
  • The supporting parent has suffered a significant medical injury or condition

What if my Child’s Parent is Not Providing the Child Support that he or she is Required to by Law?

Child support is legally enforceable. If the parent of your child is not paying child support, you should reach out to a family law attorney. Child support can be enforced by: 

  • Taking money directly from the defaulting parent’s wages
  • Redirecting a tax refund
  • Credit reporting
  • Seizing their property
  • Suspending their driver’s license
  • Denying them a passport
  • Taking money from a civil award, settlement, or lottery winnings

If you have any additional questions or concerns regarding child support in New Jersey, contact our firm to discuss.

Contact our Firm

We understand how emotional and difficult matters of family law can be. If you need the assistance of a knowledgeable attorney to help protect your right to your family, please do not hesitate to contact our experienced firm. We are eager and dedicated to helping you through this difficult time. Our personal injury specialists at Greenberg & Walden, LLC are standing by for a free initial consultation. Call us at 201-528-6928

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